Category Pet health

Pet health

Aeromonas Salmonicida (Furunculosis)

Aeromonas salmonicida (furunculosis) is the persistent sequential occurrence of furuncles (or boils) over a period of weeks or months caused by the organism aeromonas salmonicida . It is a bacterial disease of freshwater and marine fishes. There are actually several subspecies of the bacterium which are classified according to their laboratory culture properties as well as the clinical signs they produce.
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Pet health

Saprolegniosis

Saprolegniosis (water mold disease) is an infection in fish caused by Saprolegnia fungi. It is particularly common in recently purchased and shipped fishes, especially those species that are prone to damage by nets, contact with other fish and handling. Other predisposing factors for saprolegniosis include trauma and recent environmental aberrations, such as temperature drop, dramatic pH change, and skin "burn" from a toxic chemical.
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Pet health

Flukes

Trematode parasites (flukes or flatworms) come in two main groups: the monogeneans, which have a direct life cycle and live on a single host, and the digeneans, which have indirect and often very complex life cycles with one or more intermediate hosts. The digeneans include the yellow grub, black spot, white grub and eye fluke and are the topics of a separate article.
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Pet health

Ichthyobodosis

Ichthyobodo necatrix , formerly and still commonly called Costia, is a flagellated protozoal ectoparasite and a normal inhabitant of fish skin, although in very small numbers. Ichthyobodo does its damage by feeding on host epithelial tissues. Poor water quality and other stresses (especially crowding) may allow this mutualistic parasite to reproduce rapidly and overwhelm the fish host.
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Pet health

Chlorine Toxicity

Chlorine in water reacts with living tissues and organic matter causing acute necrosis (cell death) in fish. Since fish gills are sensitive and exposed directly to the aquatic environment, gill necrosis can lead to respiratory difficulty and asphyxiation. Most municipal water companies sterilize their water with chlorine or chloramine, a combination of chlorine and ammonia, for safe human consumption.
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Pet health

Nitrite Toxicity

Nitrite toxicity is primarily a problem of freshwater systems. Inadequate biological filtration, overfeeding, overcrowding, an insult to nitrifying bacteria, or a dramatic water change may cause this condition. The incidence of death and illness is usually high. Fish may struggle to breathe and their gills may be light brown or tan in color.
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Pet health

How to Give Medication by Inhaler to Cats

Inhalers, often referred to as a metered dose inhalers (MDI), are small pressurized containers that contain medication. They provide a method of delivering medications by inhalation (breathing in) of the drug. The inhaler will deliver a set dose of medication with each actuation (or "puff"). This route of therapy allows faster delivery of drugs to the respiratory tract than many other methods of drug delivery.
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Pet health

Nursing Care for Your Cat

Nursing care is often an essential component to your cat's recovery from an illness, accident or surgery. The success, speed of recovery and return to a normal lifestyle is many times enhanced by the care you provide for your cat in comfortable and familiar surroundings. Nursing a convalescing cat can be every bit as time consuming as that for a person, so it is best to be prepared to meet the special needs of your cat.
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Pet health

Tartar Control Diets for Dogs

If you smell something unpleasant when close to your dog but can't find the source, check his teeth for signs of dental disease. Disease of the teeth and gums is far more common than you might expect, and can be a source of significant pain if left unattended. Small bits of food and bacteria form dental tartar, which sticks to your pet's teeth causing an inflammation of the gums called gingivitis.
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Pet health

How to Administer Liquid Medication to Your Cat

Many cats only need to visit the veterinarian for routine health care, but sometimes they need treatment for illness or injury. Frequently, medications are prescribed. Once your cat is released from the veterinary hospital, administering home medications can be scary, confusing and, sometimes, difficult to do.
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Pet health

How to Give Injectable Medication to Your Cat

Some cat diseases require periodic administration of injectable medications. Frequently, this is done by the owner at home. If you feel uncomfortable administering injectable medication, discuss alternatives with your veterinarian. The most common diseases that require injectable medications are diabetes and allergies.
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Pet health

How to Tell if Your Dog Has Dental Disease

Dental disease, specifically periodontal disease, is the most common ailment affecting pet dogs and cats. The amount and severity of dental disease in our pets can be very surprising. The recognition and treatment of dental disease is all-to-often overlooked by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Most veterinary schools have yet to recognize the importance teaching about oral health in the education of veterinarians and technicians.
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Pet health

Lernaea (Anchor Worm) Infection

Despite their appearance and common name, the anchor worm is not a worm at all. Lernaeids, better known as anchor worms, are highly modified copepod crustaceans, related more closely to shrimp and crabs than to parasitic worms. As crustaceans, lernaeids must periodically molt or shed their shell to grow and mature.
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Pet health

Fish Radiographs

X-rays, or radiographs, are a helpful tool for diagnosing many disease problems in fish. They allow veterinarians to evaluate the health or disease status of the bony structures of the fish. They can also be helpful in diagnosing swim-bladder problems and certain other conditions such as tumors. Radiography has its limitations, however.
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Pet health

Keeping Your Cat Safe on Halloween

Ghosts and goblins. Witches and warlocks. Creepy crawlies. Not to mention Batmen, fairy princesses, and space aliens. For kids - and, be honest - plenty of grownups, too, Halloween is a time when silliness gets a chance to shine. But for the pet of the house, the holiday can be a nuisance: A nightmare of doorbells that never stop ringing, loud noises in the night and too many strangers.
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Pet health

Transdermal Medications in Cats

Animals are often prescribed medication to be administered at home. Medications are usually given by mouth, though some are injected (e.g. insulin). Many pets can be medicated without much difficulty, but some pets, particularly cats, are resistant to handling by their owners so alternative methods of drug delivery must be sought.
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Pet health

My Cat Needs Medicine - Where Do I Get It?

When we are ill, we generally see our physician, get a written prescription for medication and pick it up at the pharmacy. But, when our dogs and cats need medication, what are our options? Nearly all medication for animals is available from your veterinarian or any local pharmacy. Most often, you can get it from your veterinarian.
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Pet health

The Importance of a Recheck Examination in Cats

Delaying or not having a recheck exam can hurt your cat. A recheck examination is an appointment that allows your veterinarian to assess the progress and follow-up on your cat's disease or problem. Maybe you are thinking you can skip it because your cat is doing better? Even if your cat physically looks and feels better, he or she may not be completely back to normal.
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Pet health

How to Give Your Cat Ear Medication

Ear diseases are no fun for you or your cat. Ear disease, mites and infections are just some of the reasons your veterinarian prescribes ear medication for your cat. Remember, if your cat is in pain, she'll fight you when you try to touch her ears. Be patient, you'd be cranky too. Keep trying and you'll get the job done.
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Pet health

Fish and Anesthesia

Fish sometimes require intensive veterinary examination and procedures, including surgery, and that means they need anesthesia. The process reduces the ability to feel pain and provides effective restraint when procedures are performed out of the water, a condition objectionable to most fish. Anesthesia for fish is usually delivered in the water and is essentially done by inhalation, as the anesthetic agent is absorbed across the gills.
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